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8Shades Of… Peggy Chan of Grassroots Initiatives

In our latest edition of ‘8Shades of’, we chat with one of Hong Kong’s first plant-based pioneers, Peggy Chan. You may know Peggy from her legendary plant-based restaurants, Grassroots Pantry and Nectar, but she’s gone beyond chefdom now with Grassroots Initiatives, a consultancy for the hospitality industry, not to mention the release of her plant-based cookbook, Provenance.

On a mission to transform the way people eat – and therefore the planet – Peggy is also executive director of Zero Foodprint Asia, which “mobilises restaurants to directly support improvements in the food system with just a few dollars per diner.”

Get to know more about Peggy’s eco habits, fave products and why everyone should care about sustainability:

Photo: Peggy Chan

  1. In one sentence, tell us what you do!

I work in the field of food systems design and development that aims to tackle systemic issues in our local, and global food system in order to better create a just, affordable, healthy and regenerative planet for all.

2. Why are you an 8Shader? 

Resilience is one of the key characteristics of sustainability. One cannot sustain him/herself if he/she can’t meet the basic needs of survival – just as the planet cannot sustain itself if it’s not equipped to remain resilient simply because humans have continued to deplete it. I learned to become self-reliant and resilient since I was a teenager, to make something out of nothing, to stay fluid, creative and always bounce back stronger. I think either of these traits would have to be in an 8Shader’s genes!


3. Your best eco habit?

My 21-year plant-based journey, which eventually made it into a career! Being able to share and influence others on how delicious, nutritious and creative whole foods plant-based cooking can be is what I’m most proud of.

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

I should really be taking public transport more often, but that’s because I’m deathly afraid of huge crowds and loud people.

5. Fave eco product? 

Difficult to choose just one because it’s ingrained in my lifestyle, but lately, it has to be @nourishcleanbeauty’s Monastery line of Rose Cleansing Oil, Gold Botanical Oil and Flora Botanical Cream Serum. It feels like I’m getting the best facial and spa treatment, all in one.

6. Fave veggie dish in HK? 

Too many to mention!


7. What is the biggest takeaway you’d like people to know about food and sustainability? 

That over 80 percent of the carbon emissions in food derives from the earlier stages of the supply chain – meaning how the ingredients are grown, how land is used to grow them, and how the raw ingredients itself are processed. This is as opposed to what most people may think – via transportation and packaging waste. This means that if we truly want to tackle food’s emission problems, we MUST address the issue of animal agriculture, industrial farming systems, monocrops and land degradation due to industrial farming methods.

8. What shade of green are you and why?

I would consider myself an ancient moss green… lived, yet refuses to stop growing, and the most obstinate of green.

See also: 8Shades Of… Katheryn Pang of Green Sisters Creation

green sisters creation katheryn pang

8Shades Of… Katheryn Pang of Green Sisters Creation

In this week’s edition of ‘8Shades Of’, we turn our attention to one of the most pressing matters of our time – the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and its most wasteful by-product: single-use disposable masks.

From the early days of securing industrial N95 masks to being able to buy surgical masks in every colour, print and pattern under the sun, it’s mind-blowing how many masks humans are going through on a daily basis.

Recent studies estimate that we use an astounding 129 billion face masks globally every month — that is 3 million a minute. Most of them are disposable face masks made from plastic microfibers.

Science Daily

One easy solution? Switching to reusable fabric masks. Now before you object with assumptions that they “aren’t as protective,” it’s all about finding the right fabric mask for you in terms of fit, breathability, filtration and comfort.

Experts recommend cloth masks with three layers – one as an outer barrier, the middle layer for filtration, and the inner layer for comfort. Opt for tightly-woven fabrics like cotton and make sure there are no gaps where viral particles can slip in.

One of our favourite reusable masks brands is Green Sisters Creation – a Hong Kong-based company that produces triple-layered masks with an outer, water-repellent shell, middle layer with 99% BFE (Bacterial filtration efficiency), 97% PFE (particle filtration efficiency) and 96% VFE (virus filtration efficiency), plus an anti-viral and anti-bacterial inner layer made with a translucent thin Japanese medi fabric that floats above the skin.

We spoke to Katheryn Pang, founder of Green Sisters Creation, to find out more about why she’s passionate about sustainability and her best (and worst) eco habits:

Katheryn Pang green sisters
Photo: Courtesy of Green Sisters Creation

1. In one sentence, tell us what you do?

Green Sisters Creation makes high quality ASTM Level 3 stylish reusable masks that can be washed up to 100 times.

2. Why are you an 8Shader?

We are 8Shaders because we care about nature, animal habitats and Earth’s depleting resources. I first encountered the term ‘sustainability’ about 25 years ago when I was still in school in Canada where they recycle almost everything. I was impressed with how they could turn waste into useful materials, and how people were happy to do what was needed to save the environment.

3. Your best eco habit?

I do a little here and there, but because of the pandemic and masks being a necessity, I have to say that I’m most proud of using a reusable mask for 18 months now, which means I’ve saved 540 disposable masks from going into landfill.

Katheryn Pang
Photo: Courtesy of Green Sisters Creation

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

I love beef. I know the carbon footprint it brings; I’ve cut down a lot, but I still have a long way to go to becoming vegetarian.

5. Fave eco product?

Green Sisters masks, of course! They’re sustainable as they’re made from recycled materials, comfortable and can be used up to 100 times.

6. Fave veggie dish in HK?

Miss Lee‘s Golden Cauliflower.

7. Why should people switch to fabric masks?

Disposable single masks are hazardous and pose a threat to the environment and wildlife. Our beaches are strewn with abandoned disposable masks, and many dead sea animals are found to have ingested them.

In addition to plastic pollution, these masks are health hazards. They potentially carry and transmit viruses to others, who may come in contact with them. Cleaners are forced to pick up contaminated masks daily.

Everyone should switch to reusable masks to save then environment, reduce waste, stop endangering wildlife and promote sustainability.

8. What shade of green are you and why?

I am an olive green like the colour of my mask. I’m probably 70% of the way because I sometimes still use plastic bags, and I still eat seafood and beef. Cutting yourself some slack is fine, once in a while, as long as you’re doing the best you can and what suits your lifestyle. There is no need to judge.

Visit Green Sisters Creation to learn more and pick up a few reusable masks today!


See also: 8Shades of… Eugenia Chow aka. @eugreenia

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8Shades of… Eugenia Chow aka. @eugreenia

They say that the future lies in the youth of today. If our future leaders have Eugenia Chow in its ranks, we’re in good hands!

Eugenia is a Hong Kong-born environmental activist who uses her blog and podcast to shed light on food systems, regenerative living and intersectional sustainability in Hong Kong – while sharing her love of vegan food. Her thoughtful perspectives on the need to be more mindful of our daily habits have spurred a mini-movement among the youth of Hong Kong.

Our “8Shades of…” series aims to highlight established faces in the sustainability landscape, but also up-and-coming ones. We played a quick-fire round of eight questions with Eugenia to get to know her and her work a little better.


1. In one sentence, tell us what you do?

Through running my blog (@eugreenia) and podcast (The Everyday Activist) on topics of food systems, regenerative living and intersectional sustainability, my aim is to demonstrate how anyone can contribute to the environmental movement. 

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Photo: Courtesy of Eugenia Chow

2. Why are you an 8Shader?

My first encounter with sustainability followed my first-ever dive. After experiencing the beauty that the underwater world has to offer, I was devastated to learn that common forms of plastic such as straws and bags often end up harming these creatures and their ecosystems.

While I’m learning now that issues of sustainability are far broader than single-use plastics, this experience made me realise that we can have a direct impact on the environment around us and that it is crucial to take action if we have the means to do so.

3. Your best eco habit?

One sustainable habit that I inherited from my parents is making the most of what I have. Whether it is wearing the same clothes for seven years or repurposing old t-shirts into rags, I believe that these behaviours help encourage a culture of sufficiency and simplicity. 

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

Definitely flying. As a student from Hong Kong currently studying abroad, a large contribution of my environmental impact comes from taking a plane across the globe. 

5. Fave eco product?

Making the most of things you already own!

eugenia chow
Photo: Courtesy of Eugenia Chow

6. Fave veggie dish in HK?

This is a tough choice, but I might have to go with the veggie shao mai from Pure Veggie House because I miss Hong Kong food!

7. For people who don’t care about sustainability, what do you have to say to them?

Sustainability is not something you can choose to care about; for some, it is a way of life essential for survival. Living in harmony with the environment is the only way forward if we want to be able to continue living comfortably on this planet. 

8. What shade of green are you and why?

I would describe myself as a medium shade of green – while I actively try to engage with and educate others about environmental issues, I am aware that there is always more to learn!

eugenia chow
Photo: Courtesy of Eugenia Chow

Follow Eugenia Chow on Instagram and her podcast, The Everyday Activist.


See also: 8Shades Of… David Yeung, Founder Of Green Monday Group

8 shades with david yeung of green monday

8Shades Of… David Yeung, Founder of Green Monday Group

In our latest edition of “8Shades of…” – where we get up close and personal with new and known faces in the sustainability field – we caught up with David Yeung, the founder and CEO of social enterprise Green Monday Group.

Green Monday is the sponsor of the latest (and final) giveaway for our #8Shades8Weeks challenge! If you haven’t yet completed the easy challenge of showing us your meatless meal this week,what are you waiting for? Sign up here!

We played a round of eight quick-fire questions with David. Read on to find out his best (and worst) eco-habits, his favourite veggie dish and what’s next for Green Monday!


  1. In one sentence, tell us what you do?

As founder of Green Monday Group, I am a social entrepreneur who is dedicated to innovating and developing a plant-based food ecosystem that can combat some of the world’s most urgent crises.

2. Why are you an 8Shader?

Almost 15 years ago, Al Gore’s “The Inconvenient Truth” opened my eyes to the urgency and severity of climate change.  It led me to believe that fundamental business paradigm shift and behaviour change is not an option but a must. 

3. Your best eco habit?

I have been vegetarian for more than 20 years. I also despise any kind of waste.

david yeung eating food
Source: David Yeung via Instagram

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

Eliminating plastic in our daily living is still very hard.  Lots of innovation and changes in business practices need to happen to shift the world away from plastic.

5. Fave eco product?

OmniPork and OmniSeafood products, as they are inventions that our team developed from scratch.  If people truly become aware of the outrageous environmental damage from industrial animal farming and overfishing, they will understand why alternative protein truly plays critical role in saving the planet and humanity. 

6. Fave veggie dish in HK?

OmniPork Luncheon ramen. It is the one ‘cha chaan teng’ menu item that instantly brings back childhood memory. 

7. What’s next for Green Monday? 

Global expansion. We are very excited that our OmniFoods products are going into Whole Foods and Sprouts in the U.S., Sainsbury in the UK and Woolworth’s in Australia, along with further expansion in Asia-Pacific. 

david yeung green monday
Source: David Yeung via Instagram

8. What shade of green are you?

The entrepreneurial and innovative shade. What I mean is that for the sake of the planet, we actually need everyone to go from not green to light green to medium green to deep green. However, people, corporates and governments need solutions. So activists, scientists, researchers, innovators, entrepreneurs and impact investors all have huge roles to play if we truly want to green the world.


About Green Monday

Green Monday is a multi-faceted social venture looking to take on climate change, global food insecurity and public health. It is the creator of OmniFoods, including OmniPork and OmniSeafood, which are delicious plant-based meat alternatives taking the world by storm. Besides this, it also operates Green Common, a one-stop shop in Hong Kong for all things plant-based with dining experiences, and engages in a number of green corporate and social initiatives.


See also: 8Shades Of… Wesley Ng, Co-founder & CEO of Casetify

wesley ng casetify

8Shades Of… Wesley Ng, Co-founder & CEO of Casetify

In our latest edition of “8Shades of…” – where we get up close and personal with new and known faces in the sustainability field – we caught up with Wesley Ng, co-founder and CEO of phone case and electronic accessories producer, Casetify.

Casetify is the sponsor of our latest weekly giveaway for the #8Shades8Weeks Challenge! If you haven’t yet completed the easy challenge of BYOB (bringing your own bottle) out around town, what are you waiting for? Sign up here!

We played a round of eight quick-fire questions with Wesley. Read on to find out why he’s an 8Shader, his favourite eco-products and how he integrates sustainability into his daily life!


  1. In one sentence, tell us what you do.

I build brands and make kickass products!

2. Why are you an 8Shader?

About 3/4 years ago, I got converted by (8Shades founder) Emily Lam-Ho on a summer day while we were talking about what product Casetify should make. She planted the seeds of our sustainability line!

3. Your best eco habit?

I wear the same outfit everyday. Not only does this save me a lot of money on clothing (and the associated waste), but it has also reduced decision fatigue as I don’t have to think about what to wear everyday.

wesley ng casetify

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

I’m an avid food delivery lover, but I try to order from places that use sustainable packaging.

5. Favourite eco product?

Casetify’s stainless steel water bottle!

6. Favourite veggie dish/ restaurant in Hong Kong?

Chinese kale (chow gai lan).

7. How do you integrate sustainability into your business and daily life?

I follow green accounts on social media, like @8shadesofficial!

8. What shade of green are you?

Algae.


About Casetify

Founded in 2011, Casetify is a Hong Kong-based company that designs and produces phone cases and electronic accessories. It first featured custom phone cases by using Instagram photos and expanded to selling accessories with different designs. Check out their sustainable line of ultra compostable phone cases on casetify.com!

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8Shades Of… Amy Tsang of Hong Kong Agricultural Development Association (HKADA)

In our latest edition of “8Shades of…” – where we get up close and personal with new and known faces in the sustainability field – we caught up with Amy Tsang of the Hong Kong Agricultural Development Association (HKADA), which is looking to make Hong Kong more self-sufficient in terms of food production.

You may recognise the HKADA as our most recent giveaway sponsor for the #8Shades8Weeks Challenge! If you haven’t yet completed the easy challenge, what are you waiting for? Sign up here!

We played a round of eight quick-fire questions with Amy – read on to find out her best (and worst) eco-habits, her favourite veggie dish and best sustainability hacks.


1. In one sentence, tell us what you do?

Hong Kong Agricultural Development Association (HKADA) aims to promote the development of agriculture in Hong Kong and regain self-sufficiency as the final goal.

2. Why are you an 8Shader?

I believe that the environment plays a huge role in our overall health and it affects the quality of our food too. In order to be sustainable, we need to make good choices in our daily life such as using less plastic, being more eco-friendly, reducing food waste and consuming more local seasonal farm products. At the end of the day, the way we treat nature now will affect the lives of generations to come. The sooner everyone starts to change their mindset, the better.

I have been living an eco-friendly lifestyle since I was a kid. I used to go out to different local farms with my family and we rented a very small piece of farmland in Fanling where we planted different organic vegetables and learnt some basic farming skills and knowledge.

3. Your best green habit?

I always buy organic veggies from local farms. Organic farming methods for both crops and animals have a much lower negative impact on the environment as there are no synthetic inputs. Pesticides and fertilisers can create a host of environmental issues; certain pesticides can poison non-target organisms such as birds, fish and plants, and harm organisms of special ecological importance, such as bees and algae. By purchasing local farm products, I reduce my carbon footprint.

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

I travel quite a lot, and we know that aviation contributes about 2% of the world’s global carbon emissions. Travelling by air is definitely not that eco-friendly.

5. Fave eco-friendly product?

Natural laundry detergents, where the detergents are packed in recyclable bottles without chemicals.

6. Favourite veggie dish/restaurant in HK?

Homemade stewed potato and tofu puffs with tomato by my mom, the best in the world!

Win an organic veggie box from HKADA as part of our #8Shades8Weeks giveaway!

7. What is your best sustainability tip for our readers?

Start a plant-based diet. Eat local by simply buying local farm products, which will reduce your carbon footprint and support the local community. Overall, animal-based foods tend to have a higher footprint than plant-based foods, so the more “green food” you purchase, the smaller your carbon footprint and the more healthy your lifestyle.

Also, try to avoid air-freighted foods whenever you can, like asparagus, green beans and berries which need to be flown in and eaten soon after they have been harvested.

8. What shade of green are you?

Normal green. I always think before I buy anything, and make sure every purchased item is reusable or are at least made from recyclable materials. I also always buy local farm products. During weekends, I choose to travel by foot or bicycle only.


About the Hong Kong Agricultural Development Association (HKADA)

Hong Kong Agricultural Development Association (HKADA) aims at promoting the development of agriculture in Hong Kong, providing Hong Kongers with high quality and healthy food and uniting them with nature. Learn more here.

Next: Check out 8Shades Of Christian Yan, Co-founder of energy-efficient lighting company Nanoleaf.

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8Shades of… Christian Yan, Co-founder of Nanoleaf

In the latest edition of “8Shades of…” – where we get up close and personal with new and known faces in the sustainability field – we caught up with Christian Yan, co-founder and COO of smart lighting company, Nanoleaf.

You might recognise Nanoleaf as our most recent giveaway sponsor for the 8Shades 8 Week Challenge – if you haven’t yet done the challenge, what are you waiting for? Sign up here!

We played a round of quick-fire questions with Christian – eight in total, get it? – so read on to find out why he’s an 8Shader, his best (and worst) eco-habits and his top lightbulb moment (pun intended).

8Shades of… Christian Yan of Nanoleaf

nanoleaf christian yan
Photo: Christian Yan, co-founder and COO of Nanoleaf
  1. In one sentence, tell us what you do?

I’m the co-founder of a smart lighting IoT company, Nanoleaf, and I’m responsible for what goes on in Asia.

2. Why are you an 8Shader? 

Because we all need to move in the right direction, starting with education and awareness. Every little thing counts and adds up, so that we can finally move the needle one day.

3. Your best green habit?

Consuming less meat since four years ago.

4. Guilty not-so-green habit?

Ordering takeout or delivery with plastic packaging.

5. Favourite eco product?

Impossible Meat.

6. Favourite veggie dish/restaurant?

Treehouse’s veggie ramen and beetroot hamburger.

7. What was your light bulb moment? (Pun intended) 

Realising that the world runs on maximising profit without having balance and understanding for the damage we do.

8. What shade of green are you ?

The shade that connects business economics sense together with sustainability. 

About Nanoleaf

Nanoleaf is a smart lighting and home solutions pioneer. Available in several shapes including triangles and hexagons, their smart lighting panels can speak to one another and be customised to fit any design. Energy efficient and cool, they can even respond to music, sound or beats – now, can your ordinary light bulb do that? Learn more at Nanoleaf.me

NEXT: Check out 8Shades of Veronica Chou, founder of sustainable clothing brand Everybody & Everyone